Concert Program

FESTIVAL DATES
14 - 16 Oct 2022

Sunday Gala: Nanyubak

Sun 5:00 PM

  • Artists

  • Deborah Cheetham

    Soprano

  • ...

    ...

  • Anne Norman

    Shakuhachi

  • Eliza Shephard

    Flute

  • Emmanuel Cassimatis

    Oboe

  • Michelle Wood

    Cello

  • ...

    ...

  • PLEXUS

    ...

  • Monica Curro

    Violin

  • Philip Arkinstall

    Clarinet

  • Stefan Cassomenos

    Piano

  • ...

    ...

  • Daisy Andrews

    Featured Visual Artist, Walmajarri

  • Sally Gabori

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • Amy Loogatha

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • Netta Loogatha

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • †M.M.

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • Dawn Naranatjil

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • Paula Paul

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • Ethel Thomas

    Featured Visual Artist, Bentinck Island

  • Irja West

    Weaver

  • Louise King

    Weaver

  • Amy Cornall

    Weaver

  • Rebecca Moulton

    Weaver

  • Cheryl Thornton

    Weaver

  • DATE & TIME

    Sunday 29th November,
    5:00 PM

  • DURATION

    90 minutes

  • PRICE

    $30

  • VENUE

    Online Concert

For First Nations Australians, a song is never just a song. It is a map to identity, a way to find home. It is our way of knowing. Our way of belonging. A song is so much more than just a song. – Deborah Cheetham
Performed at the 2020 on-line Festival

LILI BOULANGER Nocturne (1911)

DEBORAH CHEETHAM Gulaga (2019)

LEAH CURTIS Clarity (2004)

EVE DUNCAN Aer Turas (2018)

DEBORAH CHEETHAM My Mother’s Country (2019)

ANNE BOYD Goldfish Through Summer Rain (1978)

RUTH LEE MARTIN Corranach for the Birds (1999)

DEBORAH CHEETHAM Song for Dulka Warngiid (2019)

Nanyubak – Dreaming.

Works that evoke the quality of a dream.

Works that evolve from the Dreaming and elevate thinking to that source of knowledge.

Deborah Cheetham has lovingly curated an other-worldly collection of reflections on travels through natural and supernatural landscapes. Deborah’s two vocal works were inspired by First Nations artworks transformed into tapestry by master weavers, and form part of her epic project WOVEN SONG, a multi-year, cross-disciplinary, international collaboration with the Australian Tapestry Workshop.

Cheetham is joined by Melbourne chamber ensemble PLEXUS and a stellar array of guest artists, including acclaimed Victorian shakuhachi master Anne Norman.

LUMPU LUMPU COUNTRY
Daisy Andrews comes from the remote Aboriginal community at Fitzroy Crossing in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. She was born at Cherrabun Station and belongs to the Walmajarri people. In 2004 the ATW translated her painting, Lumpu Lumpu country, into a tapestry. The tapestry Lumpu Lumpu country captures the drama of the landscape with its cliffs and valleys, wildflowers and blazing red earth. The carpet of purple flowers finds a visual echo in the lavender coloured sky, and the whole image is suffused with sentiment. Andrews states “when I draw my picture I am seeing that good country in my head, looking at those sandhills, flowers, everything was very good. I think hard when I look at my country. I think how I have to paint it. I look hard, it makes me sad too, it is beautiful, good country, but it makes me sad to think about all of the old people who were living there.”

DULKA WARNGIID
Through the arts program at Mornington Island Arts and Craft Centre, a group of 7 Bentinck Island women came together to paint Dulka Warngiid (Land of All) in 2008. The tapestry was commissioned for the Melbourne Recital Centre, with funding provided by the Hugh D T Williamson Foundation. Unlike other indigenous Australian communities the Kaiadilt (Bentinck Island) have no graphic, pre-European art tradition, aside from body painting. These artists have been able to build up a collective and personal repertoire of images and symbols- birthplaces, rocks, wild flowers, story places, hunting grounds, reefs, waterholes, body paint and scars. In a broad sense, each of these artists came to painting via more traditional practical artistic pursuits, such as making hibiscus bark string, singing, weaving dilly bags and making and repairing fishing nets. Each of the artists explored the materiality of the paint and surface while representing their own connectedness to land, ancestors and community narratives. “We each painted our country area which was special for us. Our painting is all of our country. That’s what the title means — country, place land— land of all.”

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM NOTES – SUNDAY GALA: NANYUBAK

 

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